Proteom profiling using mass spectrometry

eFOOD-Lab_International_02_2014

Proteom profiling using mass spectrometry A promising approach for the authentication of food 12 2/14 eFOOD-Lab international Our Authors: Christoph von Bargen, Hans-Ulrich Humpf, Jens Brockmeyer, Institute of Food Chemistry, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Corrensstr. 45, 48149 Münster Quality Management Authenticity is one of the critical parameters of food quality and in many cases consumers are willing to pay more for products with specified origin or specific composition. However, in general consumers simply need to trust the product specification. In addition, producers also have to trust their suppliers in a globalized market which has been exemplified by the 2013 horse meat scandal. From this we learned that even established mechanisms of quality control such as traceability of ingredients using product documentation might not work in cases where food fraud leads to high profit margins. This obviously attracts market participants with a certain amount of criminal energy and demonstrates that we need to rely on analytical control methods to assess authenticity. One of the main parameters of authenticity of meat and meat products is the species identification and analytical methods addressing this should ideally be highly specific, rapid, robust (also in processed food), and sensitive. Currently, mainly PCR and ELISA methods are applied for species identification. However, both methods have limitations when it comes to the analysis of processed foods or when several species have to be analyzed in parallel (multiplexing). Targeted proteomics is a relatively new discipline that is rapidly developing and that has great potential for species identification. In general, proteomics is defined as the molecular characterization of all proteins (or a relevant fraction thereof) from a cell or tissue 1. In recent years, mass spectrometry has become the dominant technique in pro- Figure 1: Sequence alignement of myosin-4 from different mammalian species. The marker peptide specific for pork is highlighted in the red frame.


eFOOD-Lab_International_02_2014
To see the actual publication please follow the link above