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Penicilin resistant S.aureus 1/16 eFOOD-Lab international 9 Food Safety his colleagues to re-think their strategy and in 1994-95 they set out to reduce the use of antibiotics by 25% within 3 years, – and succeeded! Then, in 2006 selective dry cow therapy (the green line) was introduced to further lower the number of mastitis incidents and to fight resistant Staph aureus. Today approximately 3 % of all cows are treated at drying off. The result is that today the use of antibiotics has been reduced by 70% from 1994 to 2014! And yet, more than 95% of all treatments are done with penicillin G. At the same time the %age of subclinical mastitis caused by penicillin resistant Staph. aureus has been reduced by 66% from 16% in 1994 to 5.5% in 2013! Clinical cases caused by Staph. aureus too are reduced and below 4% in 2013 (next page). So, what did they do in Norway, – do they have a manual for reaching this result, – and can it be used in other countries, regions or on other farms? For sure it can, – in big or small farms, with or without legislations similar to the Norwegian in place! I have seen it practiced in an 11.000 dairy in the US! Over 3 years they had reduced the number of Staph aureus and Mycoplasma cows from several thousand to almost none, ending up with a herd yielding 10.000 kg milk with an average SCC count of 100.000/ml! Using a recipe very close to the Norwegian, though of course adapted to conditions and facilities available in the particular herd. Extracts from the Norwegian manual: 1. Systematic prevention and management work where all available information such as culturing milk samples, SCC, health data and all other relevant data are included in the animal recording. 2. No treatments based on high SCC only! 3. A ll clinical cases treated are cultured to determine the bacteria causing the infection 4. O nly use narrow spectrum antibiotics (penicillin G) unless resistant bacteria are detected 5. Before drying off milk from all cows with a SCC>100.000 are cultured to determine infectious status. 6. A ll findings with Staph. aureus, Strep agalactiae, dysgalactiae and uberis should be treated at drying off. 7. A ll cows with a SCC higher than 6-700.000/ ml should be considered culled (will have a low cure rate). 8. Focus on breeding for cows with better health (better immune system) 9. Focus on good environmental conditions for the cows. And according to Olav Østerås a fortune has been earned already by the Norwegian farmers, – and still there is room for big improvement! Vilnius 22nd September 2015


eFOOD-Lab_International_01_2016
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