Food Safety - Manual to fight Mastitis

eFOOD-Lab_International_01_2016

Manual to fight mastitis! 6 1/16 eFOOD-Lab international Food Safety And lower the use of antibiotics at the same time…. Our Authors: Tove Asmussen, Master of Sci. Milk Production and Berte Asmussen, Master of Dairy Science One of the hot topics at the World Dairy Summit (WDS) in Vilnius 2015 was the global need for reducing the use of antibiotics in order to limit and reduce problems with multi resistant bacteria causing infections difficult or impossible to cure. With the results presented by Olav Østerås from Tine dairies, Norwegian farmers has been able to demonstrate that they may be able to contribute considerably to help other farmers! There is an increasing awareness that the way antimicrobials frequently are used among livestock and pet animals well may contribute significantly to the problems. Therefore, significant efforts now are Norwegian milk production in numbers: 8000 kg energy corrected milk/cow (98.3 % of all cows in official milk recording) 150.000 somatic cell counts/ml Approximately 1/3 of all milk milked in milking robots (may cause challenges with milk quality) No of antibiotic doses per year is 15 per 100 cows (70% reduction since 1994) Share of penicillin resistant Staph aureus from quarter samples today is 3.3% (in 1994 it was 18%) Pen G is used for approximately 95% of all mastitis cases 3.5% of all cows undergo dry cow treatment (present target is 7%) made by OIE (world organization of animal health) and other global organizations to increase awareness and to ensure action. All to ensure that 3rd and 4th generation antimicrobials are reserved for human use and that the use of 1st and 2nd generation antimicrobials will still work efficiently on by far most infections when used on livestock and pets in the future. The increased awareness of multi resistant bacteria has resulted in treatment of mastitis among dairy cows at present are undergoing changes in routines in many countries. In most cases, this means (further) restrictions in the use of antimicrobials for mastitis as well for dry cow therapy. However, – in one country the movement goes somewhat in the opposite direction and a very interesting presentation given by Olav Østerås, veterinarian and specialist in risk assessment and data analysis from Tine Dairies in Norway, clearly described the Norwegian situation. Norway has moved from no dry cow therapy until 2006. Then it was introduced but to a very limited extent and following a strict protocol. But, this has had The Norwegian Dairy Production At present Norway have: • 8,900 milk producers • 230,000 dairy cows • Produce 1,500 million tons of milk • 98.3 % of herds are member of animal recording system • App. 95 % of dairy cows are member of recording system • Herd size is 24.8 cows per herd • Average production is 7,974 kg ECM per cow • 1.26 calves born per cow year in milk production Official Disease Situation • IBR/IPV last herd 1992 (one) • Brucellosis eradicated 1953 • BVD: eradicated 2007 • EBL: free, last herd 1996 (7) 2020 (1) • Bovine Tb: free, last herd 1986 • BSE: free, one atypic case in 2014 • Paratb: One case last year, goat eradicated • Salmonellosis: a few cases (one to five) each year – mostly S.thyphymurium • Mycroplasma bovis: not found • Q-fever: not found Vilnius 22nd September 2015


eFOOD-Lab_International_01_2016
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