Industry 4.0 - Food and Feed industry

eFOOD-Lab_International_01_2016

Food & Feed industry 30 1/2016 eFOOD-Lab international Industry 4.0 Heading towards Industry 4.0 Author: Leonardo Pires Industry 4.0 is the term coined by a project of the German high-tech strategy initiative to describe the fourth industrial revolution but unlike its previous editions it is the first one to be predicted a-priori, thus giving research institutions and companies an opportunity to shape its outcome 1. Another factor that sets industry 4.0 apart from its previous iterations is the fact that it is not based uniquely on a single new technology but on several novel developments. The first industrial revolution took place in the second half of the 18th century and was based on the mechanization of the production using water and steam power. The mass production with the help of electric power in the 1870s led to the second industrial revolution. The use of electronics and information technology during the digital revolution in the 1970s developed further the automation of production processes and resulted in the third industrial revolution. One of the key aspects of Industry 4.0 is the communication of every manufacturing component and even whole production plants over the internet, also known as IoT (Internet of Things) 2. This connection will in turn lead to a more effective, flexible and affordable production of goods. Furthermore, the value added chains and logistics processes can be optimized and controlled in real-time thanks to the IoT. Another essential aspect of Industry 4.0 is the optimized decision-taking through the real-time analysis of the extensive amount of data collected from every production step 3. This includes measurement information from the product itself as well as data from the several sensors integrated into devices along the production chain. Analyzing, searching and storing these “Big Data” is also one of the main goals of Industry 4.0. What still remains the same on the fourth industrial revolution is the underlying objective of the industrial manufacturing: obtaining the highest output of products from a given amount of resources. Bruker’s ONET Bruker’s contribution to the newest industrial revolution is called ONET, a web-based server application which allows the user to set up, administrate and control a network of FT-NIR instruments from anywhere in the world. User and spectrometer administration, calibration versioning and distribution as well as central data pooling and trend charts are some of the photo: colourbox.de core functionalities in ONET. Such functionalities aim to simplify and streamline the tasks of a NIR specialist responsible for several Bruker FT-NIR instruments. Doing so is extremely important in the current scenario where the continuous demand for cost savings forbids the presence of NIR expertise in every production site or analysis laboratory. Further advantages include the increased measurement and product data safety due to the centralized ONET database architecture, thus simplifying global backups. Each ONET client also has a local database where the measurements are initially stored and later synchronized with the central database; this design ensures that a measurement can be carried out even during of a network problem. In ONET the customer has full control over its data (products, calibra


eFOOD-Lab_International_01_2016
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